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Could Genetics Influence What We Like to Eat?

Understanding the roles of genes in eating behaviors and food preferences could lead to personalized diets that are easier to follow

Have you ever wondered why you keep eating certain foods, even if you know they are not good for you? Gene variants that affect the way our brain works may be the reason, according to a new study. The new research could lead to new strategies to empower people to enjoy and stick to their optimal diets.

Silvia Berciano, a predoctoral fellow at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, will present the new findings at the American Society for Nutrition Scientific Sessions and annual meeting during the Experimental Biology 2017 meeting, to be held April 22-26 in Chicago.

"Most people have a hard time modifying their dietary habits, even if they know it is in their best interest," said Berciano. "This is because our food preferences and ability to work toward goals or follow plans affect what we eat and our ability to stick with diet changes. Ours is the first study describing how brain genes affect food intake and dietary preferences in a group of healthy people."

For the new study, the researchers analyzed the genetics of 818 men and women of European ancestry and gathered information about their diet using a questionnaire. The researchers found that the genes they studied did play a significant role in a person's food choices and dietary habits. For example, higher chocolate intake and a larger waist size was associated with certain forms of the oxytocin receptor gene, and an obesity-associated gene played a role in vegetable and fiber intake. They also observed that certain genes were involved in salt and fat intake.

The new findings could be used to inform precision-medicine approaches that help minimize a person's risk for common diseases -- such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer -- by tailoring diet-based prevention and therapy to the specific needs of an individual.

"The knowledge gained through our study will pave the way to better understanding of eating behavior and facilitate the design of personalized dietary advice that will be more amenable to the individual, resulting in better compliance and more successful outcomes," said Berciano.

source: http://experimentalbiology.org


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Thumbnail Uploaded by Solomon Merkebu Adamu, 2/20/17 11:47 AM Doctorate holders are considered as a highly educated group of a society. Cognizant of the major roles doctorate holders are said to have, the Ethiopian Science and Technology Information Center (STIC) conducted the study on doctorate holders residing within Ethiopia irrespective of their citizenship. Accordingly, they are expected to contribute to knowledge based economic growth and diffusion of innovation. Their role in science and technology is also believed to be vital. The study is principally based on the UNESCO manual, “Mapping Careers and Mobility of Doctorate Holders of 2012”. The central objectives include collecting internationally comparable statistics on their demographic and educational characteristics, employment situation, international mobility and contribution to R&D in Ethiopia. The second objective is assessing interdependency or association among some of the variables in the study. The results of the study woud have several significances. They would benefit policy makers as baseline for policy formulation. They would also help to draw the picture on the current situation of doctorate holders in the country. The target population of the study was doctorate holders below age 70. It involved 908 doctorate holders.
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Doctorate holders are considered as a highly educated group of a society. Cognizant of the major roles doctorate holders are said to have, the Ethiopian Science and Technology Information Center (STIC) conducted the study on doctorate holders residing within Ethiopia irrespective of their citizenship. Accordingly, they are expected to contribute to knowledge based economic growth and diffusion of innovation. Their role in science and technology is also believed to be vital. The study is principally based on the UNESCO manual, “Mapping Careers and Mobility of Doctorate Holders of 2012”. The central objectives include collecting internationally comparable statistics on their demographic and educational characteristics, employment situation, international mobility and contribution to R&D in Ethiopia. The second objective is assessing interdependency or association among some of the variables in the study. The results of the study woud have several significances. They would benefit policy makers as baseline for policy formulation. They would also help to draw the picture on the current situation of doctorate holders in the country. The target population of the study was doctorate holders below age 70. It involved 908 doctorate holders.
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National Innovation Surveys


Innovation is quintessentially central to economic, environmental and social development. The planning and implementation of effective national innovation policy highly relays on reliable indicator reports. Innovation survey is one of the STI indicators that measure the state of innovation.

The results of the 2015, Ethiopian innovation survey conducted by the Ethiopian Science and Technology Information Center helps to better understand the level of innovation in the country and provided indicators for benchmarking national performance. Moreover, it provides informative data to policy makers in identifying innovation activities that have direct bearings on the performances of firms as well as factors that affect, motivate and influence their ability to innovate.

 

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